INTROMISSION

intromission (in-tr[schwa]-mish-[schwa]n).

1. The transactions of an employee or agent with funds provided by an employer or principal; loosely, dealing in the funds of another.

2. Scots law. The act of handling or dealing with the affairs or property of another; the possession of another’s property, with or without legal authority.

legal intromission. Scots law. An authorized intromission, such as a creditor’s enforcement of a debt.

necessary intromission. Scots law. The intromission occurring when a spouse continues in possession of the deceased spouse’s goods, for preservation.

vitious intromission (vish-[schwa]s).Scots law. Unauthorized dealing with the property of another person, esp. a deceased person. — Also spelled vicious intromission.

“The effect of vitious intromission is to render the heir who is guilty of it liable, under the passive title of vitious intromission, for the debts of the ancestor universally — the severity of this passive title being intended to prevent the carrying off of moveables, which are, from their nature, so liable to embezzlement.” William Bell, Bell’s Dictionary and Digest of the Law of Scotland 521 (George Watson ed., 1882).

3. Penile penetration into the vagina. See PENETRATION(1).