JOINTURE

jointure (joyn-ch[schwa]r).

1. Archaic. A woman’s freehold life estate in land, made in consideration of marriage in lieu of dower and to be enjoyed by her only after her husband’s death; a settlement under which a wife receives such an estate. • The four essential elements are that (1) the jointure must take effect immediately upon the husband’s death, (2) it must be for the wife’s own life, and not for another’s life or for a term of years, (3) it must be held by her in her own right and not in trust for her, and (4) it must be in lieu of her entire dower. See DOWER. [Cases: Dower and Curtesy 29, 40. C.J.S. Dower §§ 41, 52.]

equitable jointure. A premarital arrangement for a woman to enjoy a jointure, accepted by the woman in lieu of dower.

— Also termed equitable dower.

2. A settlement under which a wife receives such an estate.

— Also termed legal jointure.

3. An estate in lands given jointly to a husband and wife before they marry. See JOINTRESS.